Sports Business Advisor Mandy Antoniacci Joins Cyrcadia Health

CYRCADIA HEALTH EXPANDS ADVISORY BOARD WITH NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED AUTHOR AND SPORTS BUSINESS ADVISOR MANDY ANTONIACCI Magazine Columnist, Sports Business Advisor and Advocate for Social Change Fills Key Position for Cyrcadia Reno, Nev. – June 2, 2016 – Cyrcadia Health, awarded the 2016 Gold Edison Award as Top Healthcare Wearable for its early breast cancer screening technology, is pleased to announce the addition of Mandy Antoniacci to serve as sports business advisor and women’s health advocate for Cyrcadia. As an in-demand speaker and nationally recognized author whose published works have been featured in Inc., Business Insider, Huffington Post, Yahoo Sports and Yahoo Finance, Antoniacci fuses her extensive marketing and advertising experience in the fields of sports, technology and health and wellness to advocate social change in business. “Is a great honor to have Mandy fill such a key position in her business advisory role,” said Rob Royea, president of Cyrcadia. “Her success in both business and in public communications within professional sports, as well as her passion to serve the underserved, will help to accelerate our message about the empowerment of women taking control over their individual personal health knowledge. Mandy’s personal understanding of the impact of breast cancer brings a unique ownership to our cause, which will help in her ability to passionately spread our key message to all women, medical professionals and financial and strategic supporters. Antoniacci is also an advocate for women in her work as a Leadership Committee Member for the nonprofit Futures Without Violence, where she advises on policy and education for domestic violence prevention in conjunction with the National Football League and Major League Baseball.  In her role...

Mammo false positives, overdiagnosis cost U.S. $4B per year

Mammo false positives, overdiagnosis cost U.S. $4B per year By Kate Madden Yee, AuntMinnie.com staff writer April 7, 2015 — False positives and overdiagnosis related to mammography screening cost the U.S. $4 billion per year, a figure that’s much higher than previous estimates, according to a study published in Health Affairs. But the study’s findings are based on previous research that has already been criticized by advocates of screening. Researchers Mei-Sing Ong, PhD, and colleague Dr. Kenneth Mandl from Boston Children’s Hospital used data taken from two controversial papers to assess costs associated with false-positive mammograms and overdiagnosis of screen-detected breast cancer in women between the ages of 40 and 49. The study included data from 702,154 female beneficiaries of a major U.S. healthcare insurer who had routine mammography screening in 2012 and who were continuously enrolled in the health plan for a year following the initial screening mammogram (Health Affairs, April 6, 2015). Ong and Mandl evaluated two mammography screening outcomes: false-positive mammograms, which they defined as exams that led to further diagnostic workup (more mammography or a biopsy) but did not result in a breast cancer diagnosis, and screen-detected breast cancer. The researchers conceded that they could not distinguish which cancers were overdiagnosed from the actual patient data they analyzed, so they extrapolated the data using figures taken from recent studies. The researchers evaluated the use of medical services related to breast cancer in the 12 months after the initial screening exam: mammography screening, diagnostic mammography, other imaging exams, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, pathology, outpatient consults, inpatient services, anesthesia, and medications. They defined costs as the total amount paid by the insurer —...

ABC 7 NEWS: A new technology that could revolutionize breast cancer screening is about to begin clinical trials in the Bay Area.

ABC 7 NEWS: High-tech bra helps detect breast cancer High-tech bra helps detect breast cancer. Friday, January 30, 2015 12:11AM MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (KGO) — A new technology that could revolutionize breast cancer screening is about to begin clinical trials in the Bay Area. Rather than a mammogram or ultrasound, this system can be used at home, with potentially life-saving information transmitted through a smartphone. For Dian Gaxiola, a routine breast screening at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View turned out to be a lifesaver. Doctors caught her cancer at a very early stage and saved her breast. “I was very lucky, I think because of the early detection,” cancer survivor Dian Gaxiola said. El Camino Hospital Radiologist Dr. Sila Yitta says routine mammograms and self-screening are the best defense, although many women don’t always take advantage. “In my experience it is hit or miss, I think women, some women are consistent in doing breast exams at home, some women don’t do them at all, and I often times get questions from women, asking simply, ‘How do I do an exam,'” Yitta said. However soon, an experimental technology could help thousands of women and doctors screen for breast cancer in a new way. It’s called the iTBra. “So you’ll be putting that on, so it’ll now be centered over you,” Cyrcadia Health CEO Rob Royea says the patches can be worn inside any normal bra. He said, “It’s a wearable device with a number of sensors that check what happens with your circadian patterns of heat change on your breast over time.” Roye says the heat changes correlate to...